Training Your Jack Russell Terrier Not To Jump On People

in Jack

When talking about jack russell terrier, what comes into mind is a small yet active and absolutely fearless white-bodied small dog. This breed likes to bark and dig and climb and jump. Well, a jumping dog is a common way to welcome guests right? In a dog's perspective, jumping to people is not bad but a way to welcome master or master's guests. However, this isn't the same in a human's perspective. Most guests and even owners are annoyed to see jumping dogs the moment they open the door to enter the house.

But even if you doesn't like your jack russell terrier to jump on people, you cannot scold or yell at him when he does so because it is part of who he is - jumping is part of a dog's natural behavior. Instead of scolding, or yelling or pushing your dog away, you can correct the behavior by simply ignoring him. Act as if you are not excited to see him or better yet, pretend that the dog isn't there at all. When you enter the house, just cross your arms over your chest and look straight ahead or up. If that doesn't work, another way to solve the problem is to have his favorite toys next to the door. When you enter the house, get a toy and throw it at the ground. This technique aims to divert his attention away from you. This one works well for me and my five year old furry friend.

Another way to deal with this problem is by using basic commands such as down, stay or sit. When your dog is successfully trained with any of these commands, he will respond to it before thinking of jumping. When your jack russell terrier does not respond to the command, then more training is needed.

Richard Cussons write articles about dogs of all breeds. Discover more about Jack RussellTerrier and Jack Russell Terrier training at jackrussellsavvy.com.

Author Box
Richard Cussons has 1 articles online
Add New Comment

Training Your Jack Russell Terrier Not To Jump On People

Log in or Create Account to post a comment.
     
*
*
Security Code: Captcha Image Change Image
This article was published on 2010/01/28